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Learn About Encaustic

Tinting Encaustic Gesso with Aqua-dispersions from Kama Pigments

Two ways to Tint Encaustic Gesso

Encaustic Gesso is typically used to prime your substrate so that you are beginning with a white ground. But, encaustic gesso doesn't have to be white. In this post, you'll discover two ways to tint encaustic gesso. Underpainting with Encaustic Gesso In 2011, Hylla Evans introduced us to Using Coloured Gesso for Encaustic Underpainting. Underpainting allows you to map out your painting composition before you add wax layers. Make your own encaustic gesso In her post, Testing Suitable Encaustic Grounds using the Freezer Test, Amie Brand provides her recipe for making your own encaustic gesso. 2 part ...
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Testing suitable encaustic grounds using the freezer test

Testing Suitable Encaustic Grounds using the Freezer Test

When I want to know things I tend to go to the bottom and gather knowledge and experience from different sources. Then I try out the facts/statements in my own practice. For me it’s important to not just know how things work, but also why. So now I have painted with encaustic for some time and feel I have pretty much a good picture of the basics. In most areas, except one. A discussed topic with a lot of different opinions. I guess tradition is interfering with new approaches. Good old facts are challenged by new science ...
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Venting your encaustic studio

Venting your Encaustic Studio

Is encaustic toxic? With adequate ventilation and a working temperature that is under 200°F, encaustic is a safe medium to work with. It is important to use a thermometer to keep a check on your temperature. Encaustic fumes, when released at a safe temperature, are not considered dangerous. Yet, all wax mediums, when heated, do release fumes. All waxes, when they are melted– whether as candles, batik, or encaustic—release a mixture of invisible fume (in the form of tiny particles) and gases, such as acrolien and aldehydes. [source] Solvents should not be used in encaustic painting. All solvents ...
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Cold Wax is not encaustic

Cold Wax is not encaustic

Cold wax painting does not use the encaustic painting process Encaustic is the name for both a wax painting medium and a painting process that uses heat to apply and fuse the medium. Encaustic painting uses heat at every stage of the painting process. The name encaustic literally means "to burn". Cold wax medium is used at room temperature, whereas traditional encaustic painting is applied in a molten state. Painting with cold wax does not use the encaustic painting process. Unlike encaustic that you heat up and fuse, cold wax should not be heated as it contains solvents ...
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Encaustic Collage with dried Flowers and Foliage

Encaustic Collage with dried flowers and foliage

Collecting, Pressing, and Organizing Dried Flowers and Foliage for Encaustic Collage Last weekend I shared an encaustic griddle with artist Denise Callaghan. Denise brought with her to the workshop a large binder filled with dried flowers for encaustic collage. Her binder is beautiful---pages and pages of pressed and dried flowers and foliage. Denise kindly gave me a queen anne's lace to use in one of my paintings. Photocopying Leaves for Photo Transfers During the workshop, Denise had difficulty embedding a dried leaf into her painting. Andrea Bird said that embedding leaves can be problematic. That leaves, even when ...
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How to paint with Encaustic

Encaustic Painting Process | How to paint with Encaustic

Before you begin to paint with encaustic, you'll need to pick-up encaustic art supplies and set-up a studio space. Once you have all the supplies you need in-hand, come back here to learn how to paint with encaustic. 5-step Encaustic Wax Painting Tutorial Follow these 5 steps to learn how to paint with encaustic Select and prepare a substrate Start with a suitable substrate, you may wish to read about choosing and preparing substrates before you continue....Before you begin to paint you may wish to use painter's tape to cover the sides of your panel. When you're finished ...
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famous encaustic paintings in New York City Galleries

Famous Encaustic Paintings and Sculptures in New York City Galleries

This past week I visited MOMA (Museum of Modern Art) and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. We went to see the famous paintings by great masters such as van Gogh, Picasso, Monet, and Modigliani. Seeing famous encaustic paintings and sculptures at the galleries was surprisingly an afterthought. Famous Encaustic paintings we saw at New York Galleries [click on the thumbnails to view larger images] Jasper Johns Two encaustic paintings by Jasper Johns were on display at MOMA. Flag (1954) - MOMA Encaustic, oil, and collage on fabric mounted on plywood, three panels. “One night I ...
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