Encaustic Painting Blog

What is Encaustic Painting?

Encaustic artforms are created using molten, pigmented beeswax. Heat is used at every stage of the process to apply and fuse the medium. The name Encaustic comes from the greek enkaustikos which means to burn in.

Here you'll learn about encaustic painting techniques & tools. Whether you're a beginner learning to paint with encaustic or an experienced artist, I invite you to add your comments to share your knowledge and inspiration about art and All Things Encaustic.

Encaustic Wax Painting Tips, Product Reviews, & Tutorials for Beginners and experienced artists alike

monotype printmaking with Dorothy Furlong-Gardner, David A. Clark and Kathleen Lemoine

Monotype printmaking an introduction | Encaustic Monotype Prints

Today is the first day of the Fifth International Encaustic Conference. This year’s conference is being held in Provincetown. Provincetown is known for its beaches, harbour, artists, tourist industry, and its status as a gay village. Commercial Street is a colourful narrow one-way street with more pedestrians, bikes, and pedicabs then cars lined with shops, restaurants and galleries. Provincetown is …

Monotype printmaking an introduction | Encaustic Monotype Prints Read Blog Post »

Playing with Encaustic

Play is such an important, yet not often talked about aspect of creativity. It became apparent to me at a crucial point in my artistic career that if there is not an aspect of play during the time that I’m involved in a piece, then it isn’t going anywhere. Play allows for letting go, and loosening the grip on the brush. This is what I aim to do in my encaustic workshops, by creating a place where letting go is encouraged.

Botanicus Exhibition – in celebration of Earth Day

“Botanicus” Republic Plaza, Denver thru May 18, 2011 Botanicus is an exhibition celebrating the beauty of the natural world. This has long been an inspiration in my own work. For this exhibition I created three 18 inch by 11 foot works entitled “Clouds of Blossoms”. I used encaustic on mulberry paper as my medium to create a translucent, ethereal effect. …

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the encaustic iron and heat resistant sponges

Using the Encaustic Iron with Heat-Resistant Sponges

If you’re not sure how to use the heat-resistant sponges and scrapies with the encaustic iron: here’s a free tutorial with lots of pictures. This slideshow demonstrates various sponge painting techniques including drawing patterns in the wax, stippling, stamping, and dragging. You will also see how to use the rubber tipped scrappy tool to draw in the wax and how …

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How to get started with Encaustic Painting | List of Tools & Art Supplies | Encaustic Basics

How to get started with Encaustic Painting | List of Tools & Supplies

Get started with Encaustic Painting If you’ve been asking yourself, “how do I do encaustic painting?” and now you’re ready to get started, this post will help you choose the encaustic supplies and hot wax tools you need to set up your studio. You can also learn a lot more about encaustic painting by reading the other posts in the encaustic …

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Experimenting with Photographs in Encaustic

Encaustic Photographs | Experimenting with Photos & Hot Wax

Photo Encaustics: Experimenting with Encaustic Photographs After attending an excellent presentation by Danielle Correia at last year’s Encaustic Conference on painting with encaustic on photographs, I have done some experimenting of my own. Five experiments with Encaustic Photographs are outlined in this post. 1. Photograph Dipped in Wax: When I dipped a photo into wax the whole image released from …

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why use encaustic gesso

Why use encaustic gesso to prepare a substrate?

A fairly new product to the commercial art world is Encaustic gesso. A very good one, made by R & F Paints, allows us to: omit the initial beeswax ‘primer’ layer create a white (or coloured), toothy, gessoed surface ideal for Encaustics start with an excellent surface for adding a huge variety of media to our Encaustic works of art …

Why use encaustic gesso to prepare a substrate? Read Blog Post »

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